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Thursday, November 7, 2019

This morning our office hosted our Breakfast Club with California State Controller Betty Yee.  Events such as breakfast club enable our state legislators and state representatives an opportunity to speak with our constituents directly and address their concerns.  I was honored to share the stage with State Controller Betty Yee. 

Thursday, November 7, 2019

Assemblywoman Quirk-Silva’s Request for State Audit on Education Supplemental Funding Released

Assemblywoman spoke in favor of the project

Orange County, CA - Assemblywoman Quirk-Silva’s (Fullerton) request to the California State Auditor’s Office to complete an audit on Local Education Agencies and the use of supplemental funding has concluded.  As a teacher for more than 30 years, Assemblywoman Quirk-Silva initiated the request last year, as it was necessary to ensure that the sub funds get to specified groups.  As a champion and leader in the achievement gap conference over ten years ago, Assemblywoman Quirk-Silva understands it is more crucial than ever that we provide a high quality education for students and provide students with resources in order to support a well prepared workforce, safer communities, and a thriving economy.

There are close to six-million students in California’s public schools from grades K - 12.  Educational funding is complex, with funding from the Federal government and state allocations.  A large portion of California’s billion dollar state budget is allocated for Kindergarten through 12 education.  In the 2013-14 budget, California began funding K -12 education, in part through the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF).  This was to provide more local control over the spending of funds and to improve educational outcomes and close the education gap among certain groups.  

“As an educator, I believe we must ensure that the intended student groups benefit from the supplemental funds that have been given to the school agencies,” said Assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva.  “The Legislature should address the concerns of requiring local educational agencies to identify those unspent funds by annually reporting on estimated and actual spending.”

Thursday, November 7, 2019

ASSEMBLYWOMAN QUIRK-SILVA AND SELECT COMMITTEE ADDRESSES OC CHRONIC HOMELESSNESS

Chronic Homelessness Hearing Select Committee gather at the dais to discussion solutions

ORANGE COUNTY, CA – Assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva (Fullerton) hosted the first hearing of the Assembly Select Committee on Orange County Chronic Homelessness at the Buena Park City Council Chambers. Approximately 125 people attended the hearing to discuss the growing concerns about chronic homelessness in Orange County, including representatives of county agencies; city governments and law enforcement; homeless advocates; members of nonprofit organizations; and other constituents.

“I sought to create the Select Committee with my colleagues to identify opportunities to strengthen on going working relationships between advocates, non-profits, the private sector, as well as local and state government, to combat Orange County’s chronic homeless population,” said Assemblywoman Quirk-Silva. “The goal of this hearing is to focus on the progress that the region has made over the last year, what we need to continue to work on, and the role each of us play.”

Wednesday, November 6, 2019

Background

With nearly six million students in the K‑12 grade levels in public schools, the State provides billions of dollars each year to local educational agencies: county offices of education, school districts, and charter schools.  In fiscal year 2013–14, the State began funding K‑12 education in part through the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) to provide more local control over the spending of state funding and to improve educational outcomes among certain groups. In addition to base funding that districts can use for any local educational purpose, LCFF also provides districts supplemental and concentration funds based on the proportions of students they serve who are English learners, youth in foster care, and those from households with low incomes (intended student groups). We reviewed the effectiveness of this funding approach at three unified school districts in Clovis, Oakland, and San Diego.

Wednesday, November 6, 2019

Fullerton City Council voted 4-1 (Whitaker “no”) to enter into a cooperative funding agreement with local non-profit the Illumination Foundation to provide $500,000 of City funds for the development of a proposed recuperative care/navigation center in Fullerton for individuals experiencing homelessness, at their November 5 meeting.

The proposed site of the facility is 3535 West Commonwealth Ave.The Illumination Foundation has begun preparation of a conditional use permit application that will be subject to review and approval by the Planning Commission early next year.

The facility would provide recuperative care for 60 people and a navigation center for 90 people experiencing homelessness.

Wednesday, November 6, 2019

State legislators hear Orange County ideas for fixing homelessness

First-of-its-kind meeting generates broad discussion.

A first-of-its-kind legislative hearing in Buena Park Tuesday covered a wide range of issues related to homelessness in Orange County, from the cost of operating emergency shelters to support for medical-based treatment for jailed addicts to the dynamics some people face for being viewed as ‘resistant’ to accepting services.

The Select Committee on Orange County Chronic Homelessness was convened on Nov. 5, by Assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva, D-Fullerton, who was joined on the dais by three other California Assembly members who represent Orange County constituents — Bill Brough, R-Dana Point, Tyler Diep, R-Westminster, and Cottie Petrie-Norris, D-Laguna Beach.

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Assembly Select Committee on Orange County Chronic Homelessness

Friday, November 1, 2019

Gov. Wilson, 25 years ago this month, you spread fear about Latinos and immigrants in an attempt to secure a future for yourself and your party. Instead, you ignited a movement. The passing of Proposition 187, and subsequent measures backed by Governor Wilson to end affirmative action and effectively ban bilingual education, roused Latinos in California to an activism that, in the years since, has realigned the politics of the nation’s most populous state. I was proud to be apart of this video movement of Latino Leaders with my colleagues of the California Latino Legislative Caucus.

Thursday, October 31, 2019

Legislators and others push for stronger regulation of addiction-treatment industry at Costa Mesa hearing

Of all the things experts believe are needed to more effectively regulate and oversee California’s substance abuse treatment industry, perhaps the most important can be summed up in one word: teeth.

The term came up several times at Costa Mesa City Hall on Wednesday as legislators, law enforcement officials, health professionals and industry representatives emphasized the need to fashion a robust regulatory framework that includes the resources to monitor and ensure the quality of treatment facilities while providing for enforcement that has, yes, some teeth.

State Assemblywoman Cottie Petrie-Norris (D-Laguna Beach) led the informational hearing of the Assembly Accountability and Administrative Review Committee, which she chairs.

During about three hours, she and two of her colleagues in the Legislature — Assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva (D-Fullerton) and state Sen. Patricia Bates (R-Laguna Niguel) — listened to input from residents and panels of speakers about how best to tackle problems in the addiction-treatment industry.

 

Monday, October 21, 2019

Assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva Invites You to a Developmental Screening for Children

Fullerton Presbyterian Church
511 S. Brookhurst Road, Fullerton, CA  

Friday, October 25, 2019 

8:30 - 11:45 A.M.