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Saturday, October 19, 2019

Formerly Incarcerated Students Find Support — And College Housing — At Cal State Fullerton

Cal State Fullerton student Matthew Vasquez (center) shows off an Assembly recognition given to Project Rebound by Assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva. 

There's a two-story house in the hills four miles west of Cal State Fullerton. It's changing lives.

"I've been living here for three weeks," said Steven Green.

He's taking two classes for his business administration major. He moved in right after he was released from prison.

"I served 27 years and 8 months for a murder-robbery," he said.

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Assemblywoman Quirk-Silva 2019 End of the Year Legislative Highlights

SACRAMENTO, CA: Assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva (D- Orange County) – As the deadline for Governor Newsom to sign or veto legislation concluded, marking the end of the 2019 legislative session, the Assemblywoman reflects on her legislative and budget accomplishments and priorities.

“Housing and Homelessness were a central focus for legislation and budget matters in the 2019 legislative year as California struggles with unattainable home ownership, high rents, keeping up with the demand of new housing development, and the increasing rise in homelessness,” said Assemblywoman Quirk-Silva.  “Issues important to the district and the state including our work on education, transparency, higher education, and veteran’s affairs as well as securing state funds for Orange County were also undertaken this legislative year.”

Sunday, October 13, 2019

Habitat for Humanity of Orange County applauds housing affordability legislation laws

High land cost is often one of the greatest barriers encountered in developing affordable homes. Habitat for Humanity of Orange County local Habitat organizations throughout the state applaud Gov. Newsom for signing 18 housing bills.

Habitat for Humanity organizations in California and throughout the U.S. launched the Cost of Home campaign in June to improve home affordability through policy and systems change. Habitat California believes that the policies signed by Gov. Newsom will increase housing affordability, housing production, preservation and responsible land use. Habitat organizations across the state are already prepared and eager to apply the housing legislation that will take effect January 1, 2020.

Saturday, October 12, 2019

Sacramento, California - Governor Gavin Newsom today announced that he has signed the following bills:

AB 29 by Assemblymember Chris Holden (D-Pasadena) – State Highway Route 710.

AB 37 by Assemblymember Reggie Jones-Sawyer (D-Los Angeles) – Personal income taxes: deductions: business expenses: commercial cannabis activity.

AB 54 by Assemblymember Philip Ting (D-San Francisco) – The California Beverage Container Recycling and Litter Reduction Act.

AB 133 by Assemblymember Sharon Quirk-Silva (D-Fullerton) – Property tax postponement.

AB 174 by Assemblymember Jim Wood (D-Santa Rosa) – Health care.

AB 179 by Assemblymember Eloise Gómez Reyes (D-Grand Terrace) – New Motor Vehicle Board.

AB 181 by Assemblymember Brian Maienschein (D-San Diego) – Hazardous waste: cost reimbursement.

AB 262 by Assemblymember Todd Gloria (D-San Diego) – Local health officers: communicable diseases.

Thursday, October 10, 2019

Assemblywoman Quirk-Silva: Tenant Protection Act Will Combat Housing Crisis

Monday, October 7, 2019

ASSEMBLYWOMAN QUIRK-SILVA ADDRESSES CALIFORNIA COLLEGE CHALLENGES

SACRAMENTO, CA – Assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva’s (Orange County) legislation, addressing the growing concerns and issues affecting California Higher Education have been signed the Governor.  

Assembly Bill (AB) 136 prevents anyone found guilty in the college admissions scandal from taking tax deductions for donations made to the charities involved.  The intention of the bill is to prevent scandals of this magnitude from being replicated.  In March 2019, more than fifty people, many from California, were indicted by federal prosecutors with charges ranging from alleged bribes paid to college coaches, standardized college testing administrators paid for illegal activity, and parents who paid contributions used for bribes so that their children can secure admissions to the best universities that the United States has to offer.

A former Educator, Quirk-Silva went on to add “It is essential that we bring back integrity to our college admissions, and the Governor signing our bill into law makes this reality. The criminal actions have victimized hard working and low-income students who were denied admissions because of the actions of those involved – and they were able to do so at the expense of the California taxpayers. These actions will not be tolerated and my bill intends to hold those accountable,” said Quirk-Silva.

Monday, September 30, 2019

Assembly Bill 133 can help keep seniors in their homes

Prior to the passage of Proposition 13 in 1978, it was not uncommon for seniors on fixed incomes who had already paid off their mortgages to nonetheless lose their homes because they couldn’t afford to pay their property taxes. While Proposition 13 continues to protect millions of older Californians by providing reasonable and predictable property tax liability, for low-income seniors it may not be enough. Voter approved local bonds and parcel taxes that are added to property tax bills above and beyond Proposition 13’s one percent cap have typically added hundreds of dollars a year to individual property tax bills across the state. One of the state programs meant to help seniors over age 65, the blind, and the disabled stay in their homes is the Property Tax Postponement program or PTP.

The concept behind the Tax Postponement program is simple. A lien is placed against the home of an eligible individual and all property taxes are deferred. Later, when the homeowner moves, the taxes are paid out of the sale of the home plus simple interest. The program worked perfectly for 40 years. Beyond paying for itself, 6,000 homeowners from across California benefit from the Property Tax Postponement program. The large majority have been in the program for decades, and hundreds are over 90 years old. Fortunately, after the Property Tax Postponement program was suspended in 2009 due to budget cuts, it was reinstituted in 2016. But even though the program was resurrected, very few seniors are eligible for the program.

In order to help more low-income seniors, Assembly Bill 133, introduced by Asm. Sharon Quirk-Silva, D-Fullerton, was proposed to increase the income threshold from $35,500 to $45,000. This figure would then be adjusted annually by an inflation factor. AB133 also lowers the interest rate from seven percent to five percent, meaning government doesn’t get a windfall when the property is finally sold. These changes are important because every penny counts for low-income seniors. AB133 provides peace of mind for homeowners worried about a large property tax bill.

To Learn more about AB 133 you can read at the following site.

Friday, September 27, 2019

California Gov. Gavin Newsom signs bills to speed homeless shelters

SACRAMENTO — California is giving cities and counties more power to speed up the building of supportive housing and shelters amid a homelessness crisis.

Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom signed 13 laws aimed at stemming the crisis Thursday. His action comes as Republican President Donald Trump criticizes California's handling of the issue, most recently blaming homelessness for water pollution .

California, the nation's most populous state, has a growing number of people living in the streets in cities such as Los Angeles and San Francisco. But Newsom has accused Trump of politicizing the issue and called on the federal government to provide more aid to get people into housing.

Newsom said the bills he's signed will "give local governments even more tools to confront this crisis."

One new law that takes effect immediately lets Los Angeles bypass parts of the California Environmental Quality Act to build supportive housing and shelters. Another lets projects that will turn hotels into housing forego certain CEQA reviews through 2025.

Another adds Orange and Alameda counties as well as San Jose to the list of places that can declare emergencies and build shelters on publicly owned land. It builds on a 2017 law that lets Berkeley, Emeryville, Los Angeles, Oakland, San Diego, Santa Clara and San Francisco declare such crisis.

"I am optimistic that we will continue to work together to bring solutions to our homelessness crisis," said Democratic Assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva, who authored the bill and represents parts of Orange County.

Los Angeles declared a shelter crisis after the 2017 law and set a goal of creating 750 to 1,500 new shelter beds, according to a bill analysis. So far it has opened 109 of those beds and has 170 under construction.

To learn more about this story read here

Friday, September 27, 2019

ASSEMBLYWOMAN QUIRK-SILVA’S HOUSING BILLS BECOMES LAW

SACRAMENTO, CA – Assembly Bills (AB) 139 and 143 authored by Assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva (Orange County), focused on California’s housing and homelessness crisis, has been signed into law by Governor Gavin Newsom.

Thursday, September 26, 2019

California Governor Signs Bills to Speed Up Homeless Shelter Construction

“I am optimistic that we will continue to work together to bring solutions to our homelessness crisis,” said Democratic Assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva, who authored the bill and represents parts of Orange County.

SACRAMENTO (AP) — California is giving cities and counties more power to speed up the building of supportive housing and shelters amid a homelessness crisis.

Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom signed 13 laws aimed at stemming the crisis Thursday. His action comes as Republican President Donald Trump criticizes California’s handling of the issue, most recently blaming homelessness for water pollution.

California, the nation’s most populous state, has a growing number of people living in the streets in cities such as Los Angeles and San Francisco. But Newsom has accused Trump of politicizing the issue and called on the federal government to provide more aid to get people into housing.

Newsom said the bills he’s signed will “give local governments even more tools to confront this crisis.”

One new law that takes effect immediately lets Los Angeles bypass parts of the California Environmental Quality Act to build supportive housing and shelters. Another lets projects that will turn hotels into housing forego certain CEQA reviews through 2025.

To learn more about this incredible story go to the following page.